Ganesh in Gujarati

We love our elephant-headed, chubby, comfortable, protector of the universe.

Ganesh, literally the Lord of Servers, is unique in the Hindu pantheon. He was made by his mother, Goddess Parvati, to be her guardian, while God Shiva, was away in meditation. Shiva returns unexpectedly, and gets stopped by someone He does not know. Keeping true to his reputation as instantly irate, Shiva beheads this young person, only to be shocked when Parvati berates him for killing their son. Now the son’s head is among the stars, how can he be revived? Again, true to his reputation as equally instantly remorseful, Shiva sends a servant to fetch the head of the first being he meets going east. The result is elephant-headed son of Parvati and Shiva. They call him Ganesh, the lord of those who serve and the one who protects all like he did his mother. The rest, as they say, is his story or our beloved myth.

But we also love to shower our Gods with innumerable names in praising them. So here 13 names of Ganesh in stylized Gujarati script have been graphically drawn to represent his most popular image. He is seated with a lotus flower in one hand and a large ball of sweet dessert in the other. He carries a axe and a rope in his other two hands. He wears various adornments on the arms and feet. His elephant head shows a broken tusk near his left-turned trunk. At his feet is the mouse, his vehicle, lowly and yet as speedy as needed.

This ceramic piece uses 12 4×4 tiles, glazed in 12 different commercial colors fired to cone 5 (2200 F) as an example of the kind of work that’s possible.

Please feel free to contact me if you are interested in owning a version of this wonderful image in your own color selection.

Ganesh in Gujarati

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About semiophile2010

word lover, meaning maniac, bilingual with metalingual interests, sometimes potter, poet, playwright, writer, mover to music, always a pontificator.
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